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Research Seminars

The department hosts a programme of research seminars by invited speakers and departmental staff. The seminars are open to all. The following seminars will be taking place at the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems (DCSIS), Birkbeck College, or London Knowledge Lab (LKL), Birkbeck College and Institute of Education.

If you are interested in presenting a seminar please contact

Current Academic Year

LKL Seminar - Professor Igor Aleksander.
Subject: To Understand ... Can Informational Modelling Help?
Date: Wednesday, 16th of June 2015, from 12:30
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr Roberto Trotta, Imperial College London.
Subject: Novel Statistical Inference Methods and Tools from Astrophysics.
Date: Wednesday, 22nd of April 2015, from 14:00 to 15:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Vania Dimitrova, Associate Professor at the School of Computing, the University of Leeds.
Subject: Harnessing Diversity in User Generated Content to Empower Adaptation and Personalisation
Date: Wednesday, 25th of March 2015, from 13:30
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Professor Sven Helmer, Faculty of Computer Science, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy.
Subject: The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
Date: Thursday, 19th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Professor Jason Crampton, Information Security Group at Royal Holloway, University of London.
Subject: Trade-Offs in the Cryptographic Enforcement of Information Flow Policies.
Date: Wednesday, 11th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Constantinos Mitsopoulos, Department of Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London.
Subject: Reinforcement Learning: Modelling Sequential Decision Making Problems.
Date: Thursday, 5th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Dr Luciana Martins, Co-Director of the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), Birkbeck.
Subject: Creating a digital archive of Andean textiles: looking back, looking ahead
Date: Wednesday, 4th of March 2015, from 13:00 to 14:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr Panos Giannopoulos, School of Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science, Middlesex University.
Subject: Fixed-parameter tractability and lower bounds for geometric optimization problems
Date: Tuesday, 24th of February 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Dr Andrew MacFarlane, City University London.
Subject: Dyslexia and its impact on Information Retrieval – initial studies in the area
Date: Wednesday, 18th of February 2015, from 13:00 to 14:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. João Carlos da Silva, Informatics Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Brazil.
Subject: Keyword-Based Queries to Access Relational Databases on the Web
Date: Thursday, 12th of February 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. Alessandra Di Pierro, Department of Computer Science, University of Verona.
Subject: A Calculus for Topological Quantum Computation
Date: Wednesday, 21st of January 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Dr. Alexandra Cristea, Department Of Computer Science, Warwick University.
Subject: Is Immersion in E-learning possible?
Date: Wednesday, 17th of December 2014, from 13:00 to 14:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. Simone Bova, Institute of Information Systems, Vienna University of Technology.
Subject: Succinctness in Knowledge Representation
Date: Wednesday, 10th of December 2014, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Dr. Georgios N. Yannakakis, Institute of Digital Games, University of Malta.
Subject: Artificial Intelligence that understands players and designs their games.
Date: Wednesday, 9th of December 2014, from 14:00 to 15:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. Hana Chokler, Department of Informatics, Kings College London.
Subject: How do we know that our system is correct?
Date: Wednesday, 3rd of December 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
LKL Seminar - Professor Neil Maiden, City University London.
Subject: Computer Science Research to Support the Residential Care of Older People with Dementia
Date: Wednesday, 26th of November 2014, from 14:00 to 15:00
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. Mirco Musolesi, School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham.
Subject: Towards Anticipatory Mobile Computing: Challenges and Opportunities
Date: Wednesday, 29th of October 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr. William B. Langdon, Department of Computer Science, University College London.
Subject: Genetic Improvement of Source Code
Date: Wednesday, 8th of October 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30
Location: Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building
Dr Alfredo Cuzzocrea, ICAR-CNR and University of Calabria, Italy.
Subject: OLAPing Uncertain Multidimensional Data Streams
Date: Wednesday, 1st of October 2014, from 16:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 745, Birkbeck Main Building

Abstracts

To Understand ... Can Informational Modelling Help?

LKL Seminar - Professor Igor Aleksander.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 16th of June 2015, from 12:30

Recently, in discussions of mental states such as 'understanding', 'meaning' and 'thought', Galen Strawson, and Tim Bayne ) have argued that a new phenomenology (cognitive phenomenology) is needed to cover deficiencies present in classical phenomenology (e.g. Edmond Husserl). Others argue that there is no need to do this as classical ideas provide an adequate description. Philosophers engaged in this debate are loathed to introduce computational modelling , but I argue that such modelling leads to some clarity. In this discussion I review the philosophical nature of the dabate and then introduce informational models that have been used in the past to discuss classical phenomenology (see: Aleksander and Morton ... Aristiotle's Laptop WSPC, 2012) and show how such models apply to cognitive phenomenology.

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Novel Statistical Inference Methods and Tools from Astrophysics.

Dr Roberto Trotta, Imperial College London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 22nd of April 2015, from 14:00 to 15:00

In the last two decades, astrophysics and cosmology have become data-driven fields. Already today, our knowledge about the Universe is not limited by the amount of data we can acquire, but by our ability to interpret them statistically and extract answers to the questions that matter to us: What is the Universe made of? Where did it come from? What will its fate be?

In this talk I will briefly review how the pursuit of the answers to some of the most fundamental scientific questions ever has led astrophysicists to develop statistical tools and algorithms with much wider applicability than the research for which they were invented. From structured Bayesian models to model selection tools, from object detection to classification problems, I will delineate how the emerging discipline of astrostatistics can help solve real world problems.

Bio:

Roberto Trotta is a theoretical cosmologist at Imperial College London, where he studies dark matter, dark energy and the Big Bang, and an STFC Public Engagement Fellow. Named as one of the 100 Global Thinkers 2014 (Foreign Policy, Nov/Dec 2014), Roberto is a passionate science communicator and the recipient of numerous awards for his research and outreach, including the Lord Kelvin Award of the British Association for the Advancement of Science and the Michelson Prize of Case Western Reserve University. His award-winning first book for the public, "The Edge of the Sky: All you need to know about the All-There-Is", endeavours to explain the Universe using only the most common 1,000 words in English. www.robertotrotta.com @R_Trotta

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Harnessing Diversity in User Generated Content to Empower Adaptation and Personalisation

LKL Seminar - Vania Dimitrova, Associate Professor at the School of Computing, the University of Leeds.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 25th of March 2015, from 13:30

User-adaptive systems are intelligent interactive systems that can adapt themselves to the users by using some model of the user which is derived from analysing interaction data. These systems enable personalisation, i.e. creating unique interaction experiences tailored to individuals' specific needs and requirements. This talk will focus on a dimension of personalisation - awareness of the cultural diversity of users – which has been given little attention so far. As shown in numerous cases, cultural ignorance in business can result in big financial losses while it can lead to segregation and isolation in the public sphere. Yet, current user-adaptive systems are culturally ignorant, at most merely translating into different languages. Within the context of cultural diversity, I will discuss two well-known challenges to user modelling and personalisation, namely ‘cold start’ (the system has not yet gathered sufficient information about the user and cannot run proper adaptation) and ‘filter bubble’ (tendency to give users things they like or are familiar with). I will show how these challenges have been addressed at Leeds by exploiting semantic techniques and approaches to harness diversity in user generated content. The talk will be a reflection on the research journey of the recently finished EU project (ImREAL: www.imreal-project.eu), drawing lessons learnt and pointing at future directions for harnessing diversity to empower user-adaptive systems.

Vania Dimitrova is an Associate Professor at the School of Computing, the University of Leeds, UK. She is a member of the Artificial Intelligence Group where she leads the research activity on user-adaptive intelligent systems, focusing on knowledge-enriched user modelling and adaptation, crowdwisdom, interactive data exploration, knowledge capture and ontological modelling. She has co-authored more than 100 papers, many of which are presented at key conferences and journals in intelligent learning and user adaptive systems. She chaired the premier international conferences on user modelling (UMAP) and intelligent learning environments (AIED, ECTEL), as well as a series of international workshops on key topics related to user modelling, social systems, and intelligent data exploration. She is a member of the editorial boards of the personalisation journal (UMUAI) and the International Journal on Artificial Intelligence in Education (IJAIED). She was an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies (IEEE-TLT) and served on the advisory board for the UK programme in technology-enhanced learning. She led the Leeds research activities in several interdisciplinary projects, and coordinated the recently completed EU project ImREAL (http://www.imreal-project.eu) which developed intelligent services to link experience in virtual learning environments with experience in the real world.

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The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

Professor Sven Helmer, Faculty of Computer Science, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Thursday, 19th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

We propose a more realistic approach to trip planning for tourist applications by adding category information to points of interest (POIs). This makes it easier for tourists to formulate their preferences by stating constraints on categories rather than individual POIs. However, solving this problem is not just a matter of extending existing algorithms. In our approach we exploit the fact that POIs are usually not evenly distributed but tend to appear in clusters. We develop a group of efficient algorithms based on clustering with guaranteed theoretical bounds. We also evaluate our algorithms experimentally, using real-world data sets, showing that in practice the results are better than the theoretical guarantees and very close to the optimal solution.

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Trade-Offs in the Cryptographic Enforcement of Information Flow Policies.

Professor Jason Crampton, Information Security Group at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 11th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

There is growing interest in the use of cryptography as a means of enforcing access control policies. For a given access control policy, alternative cryptographic enforcement schemes differ in the number of cryptographic keys that need to be issued, the amount of public information that needs to be generated to support key derivation, and the time required by end users to derive keys. This talk will provide an overview of cryptographic enforcement techniques for information flow policies and focus on some of the trade-offs (with respect to the above parameters) that are possible. The talk will concentrate on the algorithmic, rather than the cryptographic, aspects of the schemes and is intended to be accessible to a general audience.

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Reinforcement Learning: Modelling Sequential Decision Making Problems.

Constantinos Mitsopoulos, Department of Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Thursday, 5th of March 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

Reinforcement Learning is a field emerged from Psychology, that spans artificial intelligence, operations research, statistics and control theory. It is the main framework used to study human/animal decision making and learning. In this talk I will describe the general RL framework and how it is used in Artificial Intelligence and behaviour analysis. I will demonstrate its applications, combined with Hierarchical Bayesian methods, in modelling human mental planning in a simple puzzle task.

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Creating a digital archive of Andean textiles: looking back, looking ahead

LKL Seminar - Dr Luciana Martins, Co-Director of the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), Birkbeck.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 4th of March 2015, from 13:00 to 14:00

Led by CILAVS, the AHRC-funded research project "Weaving Communities of Practice" was undertaken in partnership with the London Knowledge Lab and the Instituto de Lengua y Cultura Aymara in Bolivia. The project involved an interdisciplinary team, working between the UK and South America, in archaeological, historical, geographic, linguistic, ethnographical and computer science research. Developing a simple technical language oriented towards understanding the structures and techniques of Andean textiles from a weaver’s point of view, it used innovative methodologies, combining work in museum collections and fieldwork, digital documentation and information visualization, and an ontological modelling of these data. In this talk, I reflect on the challenges faced in the development of the project and future possibilities.

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Fixed-parameter tractability and lower bounds for geometric optimization problems

Dr Panos Giannopoulos, School of Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science, Middlesex University.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Tuesday, 24th of February 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

In this talk, I will review recent and classical parameterized complexity results for hard geometric problems (usually studied within the realm of computational geometry), that is, problems where the solution space is constrained by collections of simple geometric input objects. This will include fundamental problems in the plane (e.g., covering, stabbing, TSP and related problems), but also higher dimensional problems and classical problems stemming from discrete geometry. Future research directions and several concrete open problems will also be presented. No previous knowledge of parameterized complexity or computational geometry will be assumed.

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Dyslexia and its impact on Information Retrieval – initial studies in the area

LKL Seminar - Dr Andrew MacFarlane, City University London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 18th of February 2015, from 13:00 to 14:00

A key aspect of searching is the ability of users to absorb information from documents read in order to resolve their task. One group of users who have problems with reading are dyslexic users, who due to underlying cognitive impairments in phonological processing and working memory, tend to read more slowly and make reading errors. The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of the dyslexia cognitive profile on information searching. Two studies were undertaken, a pilot study and a small study to further investigate various issues apparent from the pilot study. In the small study, searches were logged for 8 dyslexic and 8 non-dyslexic (control) university students, in order to examine the differences in searching behaviour between the two groups. A set of literacy and phonological working memory tasks were also completed, in order to investigate the relationship between these cognitive variables and searching behaviour. Results show that there is a significant difference between the two groups on the number of documents being judged irrelevant, and that this cannot be explained by a topic effect. Instead, the number of documents judged irrelevant is significantly correlated with a measure of working memory. This key result provides the research community the first real insight into impact of impaired working memory on information searching.

Bio: Andy is a Reader in the Department of Computer Science at City University London, and is a member of the Centre for HCI Design. His research focuses on a number of area in information retrieval including cognitive disabilities in information retrieval (dyslexia in particular), image retrieval, social media search and mobile search. He a member of the BCS Information Retrieval (IRSG) specialist group.

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Keyword-Based Queries to Access Relational Databases on the Web

Dr. João Carlos da Silva, Informatics Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Brazil.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Thursday, 12th of February 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

The Web is the main channel for circulating information in modern society. As a simple and effective technique, keyword-based querying has proved ideal for this purpose and has become the interaction standard between users and the Web. However, most of the information found in the world is currently stored in relational databases, and such repositories offer limited support for keyword-based queries. Performing queries in relational databases requires knowledge of storage structures and syntax of a structured language, and both are not familiar to the majority of users.

In this talk, I will discuss some issues related to accessing data stored in relational databases that might be scattered and available in the world, using an interface that is common to Web searches. I will present a method that integrates search and selection of available relational databases, as well as semantic query processing to retrieve relevant information.

I will also (briefly) introduce some protocols that were used in the present research to define and expose the metadata needed to make relational databases available and searchable on the Web.

The talk is based on many works carried out by many people, and is therefore not limited to my own research.

Short bio: Dr. João Carlos da Silva is an Associate Professor at the Informatics Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Brazil, where he has been working since the start of his university career. He received a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of East Anglia in 1996. His research interests include Keyword-Based Query Processing to Access Relational Databases, Ontology-Based Query Interpretation, Data Integration, Schema Integration, and Conceptual Modeling.

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A Calculus for Topological Quantum Computation

Dr. Alessandra Di Pierro, Department of Computer Science, University of Verona.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 21st of January 2015, from 16:00 to 17:00

Recent developments in theoretical physics have highlighted interesting topological features of some particular two-dimensional entities called anyons. The idea of using these features to realise robust quantum computation has introduced the study of the new paradigm of Topological Quantum Computation (TQC). The mathematics and physics of anyons is currently subject to intense investigations in all areas related to the study of quantum computation from both the foundational and the implementation viewpoint. In this talk I will take a computer science viewpoint of TQC by presenting a formal calculus whose syntax and reduction relation are able to capture the essential computational mechanism of the anyons manipulation in TQC.

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Is Immersion in E-learning possible?

LKL Seminar - Dr. Alexandra Cristea, Department Of Computer Science, Warwick University.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 17th of December 2014, from 13:00 to 14:00

In e-learning, immersion is a concept based on the psychological concept of flow: learners 'are so engaged in learning, that time and fatigue disappear'. We mostly know this experience from online and offline games. The challenge is to create e-learning offers that can lead to a similar intense involvement. This seems to be an impossible challenge for educational software, and thus represents almost a holy grail for online education. This is especially relevant now, with the rising of MOOCs, such as Corsera in the US and FutureLearn in Europe, backed up strongly, in a top-down fashion, by current politicians, but which suffer greatly from extremely high dropout rates. This talk will explore e-learning methods and tools which attempt to address this ultimate goal, and especially look at recent, state of the art research products.

Bio: Dr. Cristea is Associate Professor (Reader) and Head of the Intelligent and Adaptive Systems research group at Warwick University. Her research includes user modelling, personalisation, semantic & social web, authoring (over 200 papers, over 2600 citations on Google Scholar). She is ranked within first 50 researchers in Computer Education by Microsoft Academic. She has led various projects - EU Minerva projects ALS (06-09), ADAPT ('02-'05); Warwick-funded project APLIC (11-12) and been a partner in BLOGFOREVER ('11-'13), GRAPPLE ('08-'11), PROLEARN ('07), (BBC-featured) Assistance Technologies ('13-'15) . She has been organizer of workshops, co-organizer, panelist and program committee member of various conferences in her research field (including, for example, UMAP, ED-MEDIA, Hypertext, Adaptive Hypermedia, ICCE, ICAI). She has given invited talks in various countries She acted as UNESCO expert (Ministry of Education and Educational institutes), as well as EU expert for FP6, FP7, eContentPlus. She is a BCS fellow, and an IEEE and IEEE CS member.

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Succinctness in Knowledge Representation

Dr. Simone Bova, Institute of Information Systems, Vienna University of Technology.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 10th of December 2014, from 16:00 to 17:00

The aim of knowledge compilation is to succinctly represent propositional knowledge bases in a format that allows for answering a number of queries in polynomial time. Choosing a representation language generally involves a trade-off between succinctness and the range of queries that can be efficiently answered. For instance, conjunctive normal form formulas (CNFs) are more succinct than prime implicate formulas, but the latter representation enjoys clause entailment checks in polynomial time whereas CNFs in general do not (unless P=NP). In seminal work, motivated by the need to balance the competing requirements of succinctness and tractability, Darwiche and Marquis systematically investigate a hierarchy of representation languages that strike this balance in different ways. However, the current knowledge on how such languages relate to each other in terms of succinctness is still partial. For certain pairs of languages the succinctness relation is unknown, or only conditionally known (some classes of Boolean functions have a superpolynomial increase in the size of their representations in translating from one language to the other, unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses). In this talk, we summarize the current knowledge on the succinctness relation, discuss recent results improving it, and pose questions for future research.

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Artificial Intelligence that understands players and designs their games.

LKL Seminar - Dr. Georgios N. Yannakakis, Institute of Digital Games, University of Malta.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 9th of December 2014, from 14:00 to 15:00

Is artificial Intelligence (AI) currently of any help for the design and development of games? Can game agents and non-player characters get any smarter or are there better (and smarter) uses of AI within games? Can we instead use AI to automatically design new games? Or, alternatively, use AI to understand how players feel, think and react? What can we learn after mining massive sets of player data about the games we design and how can this information help us design even better games? In this talk, I address the above questions by presenting three key game AI areas that are currently reshaping research and development in the field. These game AI areas include the computational modeling of player experience, the procedural generation of game content and the mining of big (player behavioral) data.

Short bio:

Georgios N. Yannakakis is Associate Professor at the Institute of Digital Games, University of Malta (UoM). He received the Ph.D. degree in Informatics from the University of Edinburgh in 2005. Prior to joining the Institute of Digital Games, UoM, in 2012 he was an Associate Professor at the Center for Computer Games Research at the IT University of Copenhagen.

He does research at the crossroads of artificial intelligence, computational creativity, affective computing, advanced game technology, human-computer interaction. He pursues research concepts such as user experience modeling and procedural content generation for the design of personalized interactive systems for entertainment, education, training and health. Georgios N. Yannakakis is one of the leading researchers within player affective modeling and adaptive content generation for games and has pioneered the use of preference learning algorithms to create statistical models of player experience which drive the automatic generation of personalized game content. He has published over 180 journal and conference papers in the aforementioned fields and his work has been cited broadly. His research has been supported by numerous national and European grants and has appeared in Science Magazine and New Scientist among other venues.

He is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing and the IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games. He has been the General Chair of key conferences in the area of game artificial intelligence (IEEE CIG 2010) and games research (FDG 2013).

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How do we know that our system is correct?

Dr. Hana Chokler, Department of Informatics, Kings College London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 3rd of December 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30

A negative answer from the model-checking procedure is accompanied by a counterexample - a trace demonstrating what went wrong. On the other hand, when the answer from the model-checker is positive, usually no further information is given. The issue of "suspecting the positive answer" first arose in industry, where positive answers from model-checkers often concealed serious bugs in hardware designs. In this talk, I will discuss the different reasons why the positive answer from the model-checker requires further investigation and present algorithms for such investigation, called "sanity checks" for formal verification.

I will also (briefly) introduce the theory of causality and counterfactual reasoning and its applications to model-checking, mostly in the context of the subject of this talk, including some recent complexity results for structure-based causality.

I will define the main goal (in my opinion) of the sanity checks, explanations, and related algorithms, and will outline promising future directions.

The talk is based on many papers written by many people, and is not limited to my own research.

The talk is reasonably self-contained.

Short bio:

Dr. Hana Chockler is a Lecturer in the Department of Informatics, King's College London. Before joining King's College in 2013, Hana worked as a Research Staff Member at IBM Research Laboratory in Haifa, in the formal verification group. Her research interests include formal verification of hardware and software, sanity checks for model checking, automatic generation of specifications, explanation of counterexamples, connections between concepts in AI and formal verification, and integration of testing and formal methods, in particular, using combinatorial optimisation, to find bugs.

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Computer Science Research to Support the Residential Care of Older People with Dementia

LKL Seminar - Professor Neil Maiden, City University London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 26th of November 2014, from 14:00 to 15:00

Caring for older people with dementia has become a strategic national challenge, yet it continues to be afforded low social status, and has high staff turnover and numbers of inexperienced carers. Increasing the quality of care given in such constraining environments has become a pressing issue, and digital technologies have capabilities to support the delivery of increased care quality at reasonable cost. However, there has been little computer science research dedicated to support delivery of this care. In particular, digital technologies can be applied to support person-centred care, a paradigm that seeks an individualised approach and recognises the uniqueness of each resident and understanding the world from the perspective of the person with dementia. This seminar will report recent research that has developed computerised support for two tasks to deliver person-centred care - creativity and reflective learning. It will report the development of new descriptive models of creative thinking and reflection in care that informed technology development, then describe three new software solutions to support creative thinking and reflection learning by carers for people with dementia: (i) technology-based serious games to train care staff in person-centred care techniques; (ii) digital life history apps that provide interactive support for reflective learning and creative thinking about daily resident care, and; (iii) a new mobile app to provide creative support for resolving challenging behaviours. Each app will be presented, and results from evaluations of each in different care settings will be summarised.

Bio: Neil Maiden is Professor of Systems Engineering at City University London. He is and has been a principal and co-investigator on numerous EPSRC- and EU-funded research projects with a total value of £30million. He has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers in academic journals, conferences and workshops proceedings. He was Program Chair for the 12th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering in Kyoto in 2004, and was Editor of the IEEE Software’s Requirements column from 2005 to 2013. Since 2010 he has been leading computing research dedicated to support the residential care of older people with dementia.

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Towards Anticipatory Mobile Computing: Challenges and Opportunities

Dr. Mirco Musolesi, School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 29th of October 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30

Mobile phones are increasingly equipped with sensors, such as accelerometers, GPS receivers, proximity sensors and cameras, which can be used to sense and interpret people behaviour in real-time. Novel user-centered sensing applications can be built by exploiting the availability of these technologies. Moreover, data extracted from the sensors can also be used to model and predict people behaviour and movement patterns, providing a very rich set of multi-dimensional data, which can be extremely useful, for instance, for marketing applications, real-time support for policy-makers and health interventions.

In this talk I will discuss the scenarios that are opened by the emergence of this new paradigm of mobile anticipatory computing and I will present our ongoing work in this area.

Bio:

Mirco Musolesi is a Reader in Networked Systems and Data Science at the School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. He received a PhD in Computer Science from University College London in 2007. Before joining Birmingham, he held research positions at Dartmouth College and Cambridge and a Lectureship at the University of St Andrews. His research interests lie at the interface of different areas, namely ubiquitous computing, large-scale data mining, and network science. More information about his research profile can be found at the following URL:http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~musolesm

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Genetic Improvement of Source Code

Dr. William B. Langdon, Department of Computer Science, University College London.

Room 151, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 8th of October 2014, from 16:30 to 17:30

Genetic programming can optimise programs including evolving test benchmarks, search meta-heuristics, protocols, composing web services, improving hashing and memory allocation, redundant programming and even automatically fixing bugs. There are many ways to balance functionality with resource consumption (eg time, memory, energy). But a human programmer cannot try them all. Similarly the easy to write software may not give the best floating point accuracy or give the best trade off between performance and solution quality. Also the Pareto optimal tradeoff may be different on each hardware platform and it may be dynamic, e.g. as usage changes. Possibly GP could automatically suggest a different balance between multiple objectives for each new market. Recent results include substantial speed up by generating a new version of a program for a special case.

Short CV:

Dr. Langdon gained his PhD at UCL after a career in real-time industrial control software and consulting. After positions in universities and research institutes at home and abroad, he has returned to UCL where he is applying genetic programming to optimising software. He has written 3 books on genetic programming, including "A Field Guide to Genetic Programming", which can be downloaded for free. He also maintains the genetic programming bibliography.

Home: http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/W.Langdon/ project:

http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/W.Langdon/gismo book:

http://www.gp-field-guide.org.uk/ GP-bib:

http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~wbl/biblio/

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OLAPing Uncertain Multidimensional Data Streams

Dr Alfredo Cuzzocrea, ICAR-CNR and University of Calabria, Italy.

Room 745, Birkbeck Main Building - Wednesday, 1st of October 2014, from 16:00 to 17:00

Multidimensional data streams are playing a leading role in next-generation DSMS. This essentially because real-life data streams are inherently multidimensional, multi-level and multi-granular in nature, hence opening the door to a wide spectrum of applications ranging from environmental sensor networks to monitoring and tracking systems, and so forth. As a consequence, there is a need for innovative models and algorithms for representing and processing such streams. Moreover, supporting OLAP analysis and mining tasks is a “first-class” issue in the major context of knowledge discovery from streams, for which above-mentioned models and algorithms are baseline components. This issue becomes more problematic when uncertain and imprecise multidimensional data streams are considered. Inspired by these critical research challenges, in this talk we will present an overview of major research issues in this context and an innovative technique for supporting OLAP over uncertain multidimensional data streams.

Bio:

Bio: Alfredo Cuzzocrea is currently a Senior Researcher at the Institute of High Performance Computing and Networking of the Italian National Research Council, Italy, and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Calabria, Italy. He is habilitated as Associate Professor in Computer Science Engineering by the Italian National Scientific Habilitation of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). He also got the habilitation as Associate Professor in Computer Science by the Aalborg University, Denmark, and the habilitation as Associate Professor in Computer Science by the University of Rome Tre, Italy. He is Adjunct Professor at the University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Italy, Adjunct Professor at the University of Messina, Italy, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Naples “Federico II”, Italy. Previously, he was Adjunct Professor at the University of Naples “Parthenope”, Italy. He holds 35 Visiting Professor positions worldwide (Europe, USA, Asia, Australia). He serves as Springer Fellow Editor. He serves as Elsevier Ambassador. He holds several roles in international scientific societies, steering committees for international conferences, and international panels, some of them having directional responsibility. He served as Panel Leader and Moderator in international conferences. He served as Invited Speaker in several international conferences worldwide (Europe, USA, Asia). He is member of scientific boards of several PhD programs worldwide (Europe, Asia, Australia). He serves as Editor for the Springer series “Communications in Computer and Information Science”. He covers a large number of roles in international journals, such as Editor-In-Chief, Associate Editor, Special Issue Editor (including JCSS, IS, KAIS, FGCS, DKE, INS, BigData Research). He edited more than 30 international books and conference proceedings. He is member of editorial advisory boards of several international books. He covers a large number of roles in international conferences, such as General Chair, Program Chair, Workshop Chair, Local Chair, Liaison Chair and Publicity Chair (including CSE, ODBASE, DaWaK, DOLAP, ICA3PP, ICEIS, APWeb, SSTDM, IDEAS, IDEAL). He served as Session Chair in a large number of international conferences (including EDBT, CIKM, DaWaK, DOLAP, ADBIS). He serves as Review Board Member in a large number of international journals (including TODS, TKDE, TKDD, TSC, TIST, TSMC, THMS, JCSS, IS, KAIS, FGCS, DKE, INS). He serves as Review Board Member in a large number of international books. He serves as Program Committee Member in a very large number of international conferences (including VLDB, ICDE, EDBT, CIKM, IJCAI, KDD, ICDM, PKDD, SDM). His current research interests include multidimensional data modeling and querying, data stream modeling and querying, data warehousing and OLAP, OLAM, XML data management, Web information systems modeling and engineering, knowledge representation and management models and techniques, Grid and P2P computing, privacy and security of very large databases and OLAP data cubes, models and algorithms for managing uncertain and imprecise information and knowledge, models and algorithms for managing complex data on the Web, models and algorithms for high-performance distributed computing and architectures. He is author or co-author of more than 330 papers in international conferences (including EDBT, CIKM, SSDBM, MDM, DaWaK, DOLAP), international journals (including JCSS, IS, KAIS, DKE, INS) and international books (mostly edited by Springer). He is also involved in several national and international research projects, where he also covers responsibility roles.

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